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TLR plans, assesses, exercises at MG19

C-130s taxi down a runway in a formation.

C-130Js, KC-135 Stratotankers, C-17 Globemaster IIIs and a KDC-10 line up on the flight line during Mobility Guardian 2019 at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Sept. 27, 2019 The aircraft taxied in an “Elephant Walk” formation where multiple aircraft such as the C-130J, KC-135 and C-17, lined up on the flight line and flew in formation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristine M. Gruwell)

People sit at a desk.

Maj. Abraham Umanah, 34th Combat Training Squadron air mobility liaison officer, goes over flight plans during Exercise Mobility Guardian 2019, Sept. 24, 2019. Umanah serves as the airspace planning lead for Exercise Mobility Guardian 2019. The airspace planning cell reserves the airspace and develops flight plan routes for all aircraft operating within Mobility Guardian and works very closely with the FAA to make sure all flight plan routes are vetted and passed along to the mission planning cells for execution. Exercise Mobility Guardian is Air Mobility Command’s premier, large scale mobility exercise. Through robust and relevant training, Mobility Guardian improves the readiness and capabilities of Mobility Airmen to deliver rapid global mobility and builds a more lethal and ready Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Dana J. Cable)

C-130s sit on the flight line.

U.S. Air Force C-130 Hercules from various bases rest on the flightline during exercise Mobility Guardian 2019 at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Sept. 9, 2019. Exercise Mobility Guardian is Air Mobility Command’s flagship exercise for large-scale Rapid Global Mobility operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Lawrence Sena)

Airmen walk in front of a C-130J

Members of the U.S. Army 1st Brigade 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, walk past a U.S. Air Force C-130J Super Hercules before conducting a Joint Forcible Entry (JFE) training scenario, Sept. 14, 2019 at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, in support of exercise Mobility Guardian 2019. Exercise Mobility Guardian is Air Mobility Command's premier, large scale mobility exercise. Through robust and relevant training, Mobility Guardian improves the readiness and capabilities of Mobility Airmen to deliver rapid global mobility and builds a more lethal and ready Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Charles T. Fultz)

A man watches C-130s take off.

A maintainer sits while watching C-130Js from all over the globe takeoff during the Mobility Guardian 2019 “Elephant Walk” at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Sept. 27, 2019. An “Elephant Walk” is a term for aircraft taxiing down the flight line and prepare to fly in formation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristine M. Gruwell)

A woman is in a C-130J.

U.S. Air Force Airman First Class Jennifer Felts, 61st Airlift Squadron C-130J Super Hercules loadmaster, Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, performs a pre-flight inspection of the flight instruments on the flight deck in preparation for a sortie to the Selah Creek Landing Zone during Exercise Mobility Guardian 2019, Fairchild AFB, Washington, Sept. 18, 2019. Exercise Mobility Guardian is Air Mobility Command's premier, large scale mobility exercise. Through robust and relevant training, Mobility Guardian improves the readiness and capabilities of Mobility Airmen to deliver rapid global mobility and builds a more lethal and ready Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Larry E. Reid Jr.)

People stand in front of a C-130J.

U.S. Air Force C-130J Super Hercules crew members, 41st Airlift Squadron, Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, prepare for engine startups for a six-ship formation sortie during Exercise Mobility Guardian 2019, Fairchild AFB, Washington, Sept. 27, 2019. Exercise Mobility Guardian is Air Mobility Command's premier, large scale mobility exercise. Through robust and relevant training, Mobility Guardian improves the readiness and capabilities of Mobility Airmen to deliver rapid global mobility and builds a more lethal and ready Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Larry E. Reid Jr.)

C-130s wait to take off

A maintainer sits while watching C-130Js from all over the globe prepare for takeoff during the Mobility Guardian 2019 “Elephant Walk” at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Sept. 27, 2019. An “Elephant Walk” is a term for aircraft taxiing down the flight line and prepare to fly in formation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristine M. Gruwell)

Airmen are on a plane.

U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Ronnie James, right, and Airman 1st Class Noah Keene, 41st Airlift Squadron loadmasters assigned to Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, pull in parachute lines on a U.S. Air Force C-130J Super Hercules, assigned to Little Rock AFB, Aransas, after conducting a Joint Forcible Entry (JFE) training scenario, Sept. 14, 2019 at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, in support of exercise Mobility Guardian 2019. Exercise Mobility Guardian is Air Mobility Command's premier, large scale mobility exercise. Through robust and relevant training, Mobility Guardian improves the readiness and capabilities of Mobility Airmen to deliver rapid global mobility and builds a more lethal and ready Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Charles T. Fultz)

C-130s prepare to take off.
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A C-130J from Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, and a C-130J from Ramstein Air Base, Germany, prepare to takeoff during Mobility Guardian 2019 at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Sept. 27, 2019. Numerous aircraft from across the globe participated in MG19 such as the C-130J and the C-17 Globemaster III. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristine M. Gruwell)

Airmen are on a plane.
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A C-130 Hercules crew from Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, prepares to unload cargo at the start of Air Mobility Command’s Mobility Guardian 2019 exercise at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Sept. 8, 2019. Through robust and relevant training, Mobility Guardian is designed to build full spectrum readiness and develop Air Mobility Airmen to ensure we deliver rapid global mobility now and in the future. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Lackey)

A C-130 waits to take off.
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A maintainer sits on top of a C-5M Super Galaxy from Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, while watching a C-130J from Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, prepare for takeoff during the Mobility Guardian 2019 “Elephant Walk” at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Sept. 27, 2019. An “Elephant Walk” is a term for aircraft taxiing down the flight line and prepare to fly in formation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristine M. Gruwell)

LITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE, Ark. --

Exercise Mobility Guardian 2019, Air Mobility Command’s premier large – scale mobility exercise created an environment from September 8-28, 2019, where Team Little Rock became Ready Warriors alongside joint and international partners to ensure they could deliver rapid global mobility now, and in the future.

Mobility Airmen from across the globe integrated at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, to continue the momentum of readiness by keeping their global, competitive edge through exercising in contested, degraded and operationally-limited environments. 

“We got a lot of training objectives done, but the biggest thing was watching the individuals build relationships with international partners and other Mobility Airmen such as the tanker community and C-17 community,” said U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Jonathan Esses, 41st Airlift Squadron director of operations. “In the future, when these Airmen run into each other in real-world scenarios, their communication and teamwork will be that much stronger.”

Approximately 250 pilots, loadmasters, aerial porters and maintenance Airmen from TLR participated in MG19 throughout the three-week exercise. Little Rock Air Force Base’s Ready Warriors were only one piece of the 4,000 Mobility Airman puzzle that formed MG19.

U.S. Army airborne paratroopers, riggers and field artillery personnel from across the nation, international allies from Australia, Canada, Chile, United Arab Emirates and many more countries around the world, added to the 4,000 - participant team which made up MG19.

“Practicing with our joint service and international allies lets us take advantage of our strengths, and notice the weaknesses to make the best strategic decision while enhancing the vital partnerships we rely on to accomplish the mission,” said U.S. Air Force Col. Shane Haughian, 19th Operations Group commander.

These participants exercised airdrops, aeromedical evacuations, contingency response and many more mobility missions. Not all members of TLR were training, some of them were performing assessments to ensure Mobility Airmen are always ready.

Members of the 34th Combat Training Squadron, along with their augmentees, arrived seven days before the exercise began, and stayed seven days after it ended to prepare the environment and injects for the incoming Airmen.

The 34th CTS Airmen’s role in MG19 was to observe, coach and train the Airmen as they performed the tasks required of them in a contested, austere environment. These observers, coaches and trainers also wrote assessments for senior leadership so the next MG can be improved further.  

Not only are these assessments going to enhance future MG exercises, the knowledge gained by the participants will set a foundation for the 19th AW’s own biannual exercise — the ROCKI.

“Now we can really step it up for the crews who already have this experience,” Esses said. “With this baseline, we’ll be able to step up the enemy threat capability at the next ROCKI and exercise against it.”

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