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Army’s JRTC kicks off GFLR 20-03

Soldiers from the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, perform gear checks prior to boarding a C-130J Super Hercules during the joint forcible entry and airborne assault.

Soldiers from the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, perform gear checks prior to boarding a C-130J Super Hercules during the joint forcible entry and airborne assault which kicked off Green Flag Little Rock 20-03 at Alexandria International Airport in Alexandria, Louisiana, Jan. 12, 2020. Exercises like GFLR 20-03 ensure the development of ready, willing and capable partners to collectively address global security challenges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Irvin)

Soldiers from the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, wait to board a C-130J Super Hercules during the joint forcible entry and airborne assault.

Soldiers from the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, wait to board a C-130J Super Hercules during the joint forcible entry and airborne assault which kicked off Green Flag Little Rock 20-03 at Alexandria International Airport in Alexandria, Louisiana, Jan. 12, 2020. GFLR 20-03 was held in conjunction with exercise JRTC 20-3 in Fort Polk, Louisiana, the Army’s final certification event before they are deemed ready to deploy or assume a ready force posture. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Irvin)

Soldiers from the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, board a C-130J Super Hercules during the joint forcible entry and airborne assault.

Soldiers from the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, board a C-130J Super Hercules during the joint forcible entry and airborne assault which kicked off Green Flag Little Rock 20-03 at Alexandria International Airport in Alexandria, Louisiana, Jan. 12, 2020. GFLR allows the Air Force to improve the joint relationship between mobility air forces and joint partners. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Irvin)

Soldiers from the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, perform gear checks prior to boarding a C-130J Super Hercules during the joint forcible entry and airborne assault.

Soldiers from the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, perform gear checks prior to boarding a C-130J Super Hercules during the joint forcible entry and airborne assault which kicked off Green Flag Little Rock 20-03 at Alexandria International Airport in Alexandria, Louisiana, Jan. 12, 2020. GFLR 20-03 was held in conjunction with exercise JRTC 20-3 in Fort Polk, Louisiana, the Army’s final certification event before they are deemed ready to deploy or assume a ready force posture. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Irvin)

Soldiers from the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, prepare their gear prior to boarding a C-130J Super Hercules during the joint forcible entry and airborne assault which kicked off Green Flag Little Rock 20-03.

Soldiers from the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, prepare their gear prior to boarding a C-130J Super Hercules during the joint forcible entry and airborne assault which kicked off Green Flag Little Rock 20-03 at Alexandria International Airport in Alexandria, Louisiana, Jan. 12, 2020. Exercises like GFLR 20-03 ensure the development of ready, willing and capable partners to collectively address global security challenges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Irvin)

U.S. Air Force reservist Tech. Sgt. Kristen Garrett, 96th Aerial Port Squadron air transportation specialist, performs a maintenance check on a K-loader during Green Flag Little Rock 20-03.

U.S. Air Force reservist Tech. Sgt. Kristen Garrett, 96th Aerial Port Squadron air transportation specialist, performs a maintenance check on a K-loader during Green Flag Little Rock 20-03 at Alexandria International Airport in Alexandria, Louisiana, Jan. 11, 2020. Exercises like GFLR 20-03 ensure the development of ready, willing and capable partners to collectively address global security challenges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Irvin)

An Airman from the 621st Contingency Response Wing speaks with a member of the 31st Canadian Brigade Group before the joint forcible entry and airborne assault, which kicked off Green Flag Little Rock 20-03.

An Airman from the 621st Contingency Response Wing speaks with a member of the 31st Canadian Brigade Group before the joint forcible entry and airborne assault, which kicked off Green Flag Little Rock 20-03 at Alexandria International Airport in Alexandria, Louisiana, Jan. 12, 2020. GFLR allows the Air Force to improve the joint relationship between mobility air forces and joint partners. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Irvin)

A soldier from the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, checks the tire pressure on a Humvee during Green Flag Little Rock 20-03.

A soldier from the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, checks the tire pressure on a Humvee during Green Flag Little Rock 20-03 at Alexandria International Airport in Alexandria, Louisiana, Jan. 12, 2020. GFLR 20-03 was held in conjunction with exercise JRTC 20-3 in Fort Polk, Louisiana, the Army’s final certification event before they are deemed ready to deploy or assume a ready force posture. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Irvin)

A soldier from the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, walks to a C-17 Globemaster III during the joint forcible entry and airborne assault which kicked off Green Flag Little Rock 20-03.

A soldier from the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, walks to a C-17 Globemaster III during the joint forcible entry and airborne assault which kicked off Green Flag Little Rock 20-03 at Alexandria International Airport in Alexandria, Louisiana, Jan. 12, 2020. GFLR 20-03 was held in conjunction with exercise JRTC 20-3 in Fort Polk, Louisiana, the Army’s final certification event before they are deemed ready to deploy or assume a ready force posture. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Irvin)

A pilot from the 61st Airlift Squadron gives a pre-flight mission brief on the back of a C-130J Super Hercules during the joint forcible entry and airborne assault which kicked off Green Flag Little Rock 20-03.
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A pilot from the 61st Airlift Squadron gives a pre-flight mission brief on the back of a C-130J Super Hercules during the joint forcible entry and airborne assault which kicked off Green Flag Little Rock 20-03 at Alexandria International Airport in Alexandria, Louisiana, Jan. 12, 2020. GFLR 20-03 focused on the ability to operate cohesively in an austere environment while being able to rapidly assemble forces in response to crises. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Irvin)

A loadmaster from the 41st Airlift Squadron performs a pre-flight check during Green Flag Little Rock 20-03.
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A loadmaster from the 41st Airlift Squadron performs a pre-flight check during Green Flag Little Rock 20-03 at Alexandria International Airport in Alexandria, Louisiana, Jan. 11, 2020. GFLR allows the Air Force to improve the joint relationship between mobility air forces and joint partners. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Irvin)

LITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE, Ark. --

Personnel from the 34th Combat Training Squadron and the U.S. Army collaborated with coalition forces from Canada during the joint forcible entry and airborne assault to kick off exercise Green Flag Little Rock 20-03 Jan. 11-21, 2020, at the Joint Readiness Training Center at Fort Polk, Louisiana and Alexandria, Louisiana.

GFLR 20-03 was held in conjunction with exercise JRTC 20-3 in Fort Polk, the Army’s final certification event before they are deemed ready to deploy or assume a ready force posture.

This Joint live-training tactical exercise focused on combat airlift and airdrop operations, interoperability with our Joint and international partners, as well as survival, evasion, resistance and escape.

“In the 34th CTS, our focus is on improving the joint relationship between the mobility air forces and our joint partners,” said U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Phillip Newman, 34th CTS director of operations.

This exercise also included partners from the 921st Contingency Response Squadron at Travis Air Force Base, California, 321st Contingency Response Squadron at McConnell Air Force Base, Kansas, U.S. Army, six C-130J Super Hercules from the 41st and 61st Airlift Squadrons from Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, four C-17 Globemaster III’s from the 62nd Airlift Wing at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, two C-17 Globemaster III’s from the 437th Airlift Wing at Joint Base Charleston, South Carolina, and two C-130J Super Hercules’ from the Royal Canadian air force. 

The desired training objective was to simulate an airfield assault, airfield opening and subsequent follow-on sustainment support in which participants train together to ensure efficient interoperability for potential future operations, Newman said.

“We’re trying to give our crews combat-like experience before they deploy by increasing exposure to working with an external command and control agency,” he explained.

In addition to promoting interoperability between the U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force and international partners, this exercise focused on the ability to operate cohesively in an austere environment and being able to rapidly assemble forces in response to crises.

“The joint force aspect improves everyone involved,” Newman said. “It allows the U.S. Army users to become familiar with different regulations the U.S. Air Force has on preparing cargo before it can be loaded on an aircraft. From a planning perspective, it allows U.S. Air Force aircrew to better understand how important the training is to increase cohesiveness and lethality.”

Exercises like this improve the process of getting a ground force moved into an area as rapidly as possible so they can build a combat capability in the objective area.

“This exercise helps aircrew the “why” behind all the training while also being able to drop actual equipment and personnel rather than simulating it,” Newman said.

Exercises like GFLR 20-03 and JRTC 20-3 ensures the development of ready, willing and capable partners to collectively address global security challenges.

“This training allows our crews to be immersed in a scenario that an individual base or squadron can’t organically create,” said U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Thomas Joyner, 34th CTS commander. “We aren’t going to get the same level of players, threat systems, or the Joint effort aspect obtained in a standard exercise. GFLR is a much more robust and enriched training environment for all participants.”

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