News happening around Little Rock Air Force Base

News

19th AW trains in aircraft radiological recovery

men step off a plane

U.S. Air Force Capt. Ryan McGill and Capt. Hunter Hammer, 61st Airlift Squadron pilots, step off a C-130J Super Hercules in personal protective equipment during radiological aircraft recovery training at Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Oct. 24, 2019. The 19th Airlift Wing held radiological aircraft recovery training in order to hone their ability to provide Rapid Global Mobility within contested environments and prepare Airmen to compete with peer adversaries in every domain. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mariam K. Springs)

a man holding an object

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jonathan Domingues, 19th Operational Medical Readiness Squadron bioenvironmental engineer, holds a Survey Meter ADM-300A used to detect radiation at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark, Oct. 24, 2019. The 19th Airlift Wing held radiological aircraft recovery training in order to hone their ability to provide Rapid Global Mobility within contested environments and prepare Airmen to compete with peer adversaries in every domain. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mariam K. Springs)

a man inspects an aircraft

U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Santino Cozza and U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jonathan Domingues, 19th Operational Medical Readiness Squadron bioenvironmental engineers, monitors the nose radome with a Victoreen 451P during radiological aircraft recovery training at Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Oct. 24, 2019. During the training, Airmen from the 19th OMRS Bioenvironmental Engineering Flight used equipment to detect and monitor radiation, giving them real-world practice for this type of scenario. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mariam K. Springs)

people inspect an aircraft

Airmen from the 19th Airlift Wing take part in radiological aircraft recovery training at Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Oct. 31, 2019. The 19th AW held radiological aircraft recovery training in order to hone their ability to provide Rapid Global Mobility within contested environments and prepare Airmen to compete with peer adversaries in every domain. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mariam K. Springs)

3 men

Airmen from the 19th Airlift Wing perform deecontamination protocol during radiological aircraft recovery training at Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Oct. 31, 2019. The 19th AW held radiological aircraft recovery training in order to hone their ability to provide Rapid Global Mobility within contested environments and prepare Airmen to compete with peer adversaries in every domain. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mariam K. Springs)

a man inspects a man

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Dustin Roberts, 19th Civil Engineer emergency management journeyman, uses Alpha Probe-100 to monitor aircrew members for the presence of alpha radiation contamination at Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Oct. 24, 2019. This training is intended to familiarize Airmen with the proper procedures on conducting decontamination protocol on the flight line. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mariam K. Springs)

a load with a plane

Airmen from the 19th Operations Group and the 19th Mission Support Group download simulated contaminated cargo during radiological aircraft recovery training at Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Oct. 31, 2019. The 19th AW held radiological aircraft recovery training in order to hone their ability to provide Rapid Global Mobility within contested environments and prepare Airmen to compete with peer adversaries in every domain. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mariam K. Springs)

men in a line

Airmen from the 19th Airlift Wing perform deecontamination protocol during radiological aircraft recovery training at Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Oct. 31, 2019. The 19th AW held radiological aircraft recovery training in order to hone their ability to provide Rapid Global Mobility within contested environments and prepare Airmen to compete with peer adversaries in every domain. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mariam K. Springs)

LITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE, Ark. --

The 19th Airlift Wing held radiological aircraft recovery training at Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, Oct. 24 and Oct. 31, 2019, in order to hone their ability to provide Rapid Global Mobility within contested environments and prepare Airmen to compete with peer adversaries in every domain.

The purpose of the training is to continue to aggressively mitigate challenges of mobility operations in contested environments through deliberate efforts that fortify command and control systems and enhance aircraft survivability. 

“The strategic mindset behind this is if we prepare for it, an enemy is less inclined to use it as a way to make us back down,” said U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Michael Trimble, 19th Airlift Wing chief of safety, who leads the Readiness Integration Cell. “If we’re unprepared and we don’t have the capability to get our people and move them then the adversary may be bold enough to think they have a viable nuclear option.”

The scenario for the training was for aircraft to simulate flying into a radiological environment using the appropriate protective gear. Personnel on the aircraft were then met at the flight line with trained professionals to help them get the care and decontamination they would need, as well as decontaminate cargo and the aircraft.

This training included efforts from the 19th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, 19th Operational Medical Readiness Squadron, 19th Civil Engineer Squadron, 19th Logistic Readiness Squadron, and 19th Operations Support Squadron.

“We get to work with a lot of different people on the base,” said U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Santino Cozza, 19th OMRS bioenvironmental engineer. “It shows the unity of the Air Force. You have everyone with their different missions all coming together to ultimately return Airmen and equipment safely to the mission.”

During the training, Airmen from the 19th OMRS Bioenvironmental Engineering Flight used equipment to detect and monitor radiation, giving them real-world practice for this type of scenario.

“The more we practice, train and prepare the better and more effective we become,” Cozza said. “I think it’s good for our Airmen to get used to the type of equipment because it’s not something we use every day.”

Trimble emphasized the significance of using 19th AW Airmen to provide a realistic situation they can learn from.

“We are getting to showcase what we can do and at the same time admit when we need help and look to the experts for guidance,” Trimble said.

The variety of units involved came together to contribute vital mission sets to complete the training. 

“One of the important lessons is that it’s not an operations group problem or maintenance group problem, we have to work across the entire base and integrate in ways we haven’t before,” Trimble said.  “It breaks down some of the stovepipes that govern how we operate day to day.”

Our diversity as a team of professional Airmen is our strength, from the flight line to the front lines— every member of 19th Airlift Wing embodies the mentality that defines us as Ready Warriors.

“It’s what separates us from our civilian counterparts,” Cozza said. “At the drop of a hat we can take our expertise and bring it to another location and we can apply that expertise there. The readiness component is what it ultimately means to serve.”

USAF Comments Policy
If you wish to comment, use the text box below. AF reserves the right to modify this policy at any time.

This is a moderated forum. That means all comments will be reviewed before posting. In addition, we expect that participants will treat each other, as well as our agency and our employees, with respect. We will not post comments that contain abusive or vulgar language, spam, hate speech, personal attacks, violate EEO policy, are offensive to other or similar content. We will not post comments that are spam, are clearly "off topic", promote services or products, infringe copyright protected material, or contain any links that don't contribute to the discussion. Comments that make unsupported accusations will also not be posted. The AF and the AF alone will make a determination as to which comments will be posted. Any references to commercial entities, products, services, or other non-governmental organizations or individuals that remain on the site are provided solely for the information of individuals using this page. These references are not intended to reflect the opinion of the AF, DoD, the United States, or its officers or employees concerning the significance, priority, or importance to be given the referenced entity, product, service, or organization. Such references are not an official or personal endorsement of any product, person, or service, and may not be quoted or reproduced for the purpose of stating or implying AF endorsement or approval of any product, person, or service.

Any comments that report criminal activity including: suicidal behaviour or sexual assault will be reported to appropriate authorities including OSI. This forum is not:

  • This forum is not to be used to report criminal activity. If you have information for law enforcement, please contact OSI or your local police agency.
  • Do not submit unsolicited proposals, or other business ideas or inquiries to this forum. This site is not to be used for contracting or commercial business.
  • This forum may not be used for the submission of any claim, demand, informal or formal complaint, or any other form of legal and/or administrative notice or process, or for the exhaustion of any legal and/or administrative remedy.

AF does not guarantee or warrant that any information posted by individuals on this forum is correct, and disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from reliance on any such information. AF may not be able to verify, does not warrant or guarantee, and assumes no liability for anything posted on this website by any other person. AF does not endorse, support or otherwise promote any private or commercial entity or the information, products or services contained on those websites that may be reached through links on our website.

Members of the media are asked to send questions to the public affairs through their normal channels and to refrain from submitting questions here as comments. Reporter questions will not be posted. We recognize that the Web is a 24/7 medium, and your comments are welcome at any time. However, given the need to manage federal resources, moderating and posting of comments will occur during regular business hours Monday through Friday. Comments submitted after hours or on weekends will be read and posted as early as possible; in most cases, this means the next business day.

For the benefit of robust discussion, we ask that comments remain "on-topic." This means that comments will be posted only as it relates to the topic that is being discussed within the blog post. The views expressed on the site by non-federal commentators do not necessarily reflect the official views of the AF or the Federal Government.

To protect your own privacy and the privacy of others, please do not include personally identifiable information, such as name, Social Security number, DoD ID number, OSI Case number, phone numbers or email addresses in the body of your comment. If you do voluntarily include personally identifiable information in your comment, such as your name, that comment may or may not be posted on the page. If your comment is posted, your name will not be redacted or removed. In no circumstances will comments be posted that contain Social Security numbers, DoD ID numbers, OSI case numbers, addresses, email address or phone numbers. The default for the posting of comments is "anonymous", but if you opt not to, any information, including your login name, may be displayed on our site.

Thank you for taking the time to read this comment policy. We encourage your participation in our discussion and look forward to an active exchange of ideas.

Photo Gallery: Week in Review

News Search