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Veterinary Treatment Facility supports Little Rock AFB

Dr. Arnetha Brooks, Veterinary Treatment Facility veterinarian, and Army Staff Sgt. Travis Lausier, Veterinary Treatment Facility noncommissioned officer in charge, shaves a dog’s leg to prepare for surgery Aug. 22, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The dog had a growth removed, which is one of the clinics routine surgeries that is offered. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caleb Pierce)

Dr. Arnetha Brooks, Veterinary Treatment Facility veterinarian, and Army Staff Sgt. Travis Lausier, Veterinary Treatment Facility noncommissioned officer in charge, shaves a dog’s leg to prepare for surgery Aug. 22, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The dog had a growth removed, which is one of the clinics routine surgeries that is offered. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caleb Pierce)

Senior Airman Muhammed Yaqeen, a 19th Security Forces Squadron K-9 handler, holds Jeck, a military working dog, while being examined by Army Staff Sgt. Travis Lausier, Veterinary Treatment Facility noncommissioned officer in charge, Aug. 21, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark.  The veterinarian clinic’s primary mission is to provide full medical care for the military working dogs to ensure the dogs are fully mission capable. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caleb Pierce)

Senior Airman Muhammed Yaqeen, a 19th Security Forces Squadron K-9 handler, holds Jeck, a military working dog, while being examined by Army Staff Sgt. Travis Lausier, Veterinary Treatment Facility noncommissioned officer in charge, Aug. 21, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The veterinarian clinic’s primary mission is to provide full medical care for the military working dogs to ensure the dogs are fully mission capable. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caleb Pierce)

Army Staff Sgt. Travis Lausier, Veterinary Treatment Facility noncommissioned officer in charge, sanitizes a dog’s back to prepare for surgery Aug. 22, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The clinic performs routine procedures such as spays, neuters, growth removals and dental work. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caleb Pierce)

Army Staff Sgt. Travis Lausier, Veterinary Treatment Facility noncommissioned officer in charge, sanitizes a dog’s back to prepare for surgery Aug. 22, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The clinic performs routine procedures such as spays, neuters, growth removals and dental work. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caleb Pierce)

Dr. Arnetha Brooks, Veterinary Treatment Facility veternarian, removes a mass from a dog during surgery Aug. 22, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The dog had a growth removed, which is one of the clinics routine surgeries that is offered. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caleb Pierce)

Dr. Arnetha Brooks, Veterinary Treatment Facility veternarian, removes a mass from a dog during surgery Aug. 22, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The dog had a growth removed, which is one of the clinics routine surgeries that is offered. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caleb Pierce)

Dr. Arnetha Brooks, Veterinary Treatment Facility veterinarian, removes a mass from a dog during surgery Aug. 22, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The clinic performs routine procedures such as spays, neuters, growth removals and dental work. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caleb Pierce)

Dr. Arnetha Brooks, Veterinary Treatment Facility veterinarian, removes a mass from a dog during surgery Aug. 22, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The clinic performs routine procedures such as spays, neuters, growth removals and dental work. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caleb Pierce)

Dr. Arnetha Brooks, Veterinary Treatment Facility veterinarian, removes a mass from a dog during surgery Aug. 22, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The clinic performs routine procedures such as spays, neuters, growth removals and dental work. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caleb Pierce)

Dr. Arnetha Brooks, Veterinary Treatment Facility veterinarian, removes a mass from a dog during surgery Aug. 22, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The clinic performs routine procedures such as spays, neuters, growth removals and dental work. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caleb Pierce)

Valerie Cook holds her dog Izzy while she’s being examined by Dr. Arnetha Brooks, Veterinary Treatment Facility veterinarian, Aug. 21, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark.  The clinic offers many services including vaccinations, routine surgeries and dental care to any active-duty member, retiree, reservists, or anyone with an ID card. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caleb Pierce)

Valerie Cook holds her dog Izzy while she’s being examined by Dr. Arnetha Brooks, Veterinary Treatment Facility veterinarian, Aug. 21, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The clinic offers many services including vaccinations, routine surgeries and dental care to any active-duty member, retiree, reservists, or anyone with an ID card. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caleb Pierce)

Jeck, a 19th Security Forces Squadron military working dog, receives an eye check during an exam Aug. 21, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The veterinarian clinic’s primary mission is to provide full medical care for the military working dogs to ensure the dogs are fully mission-capable. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caleb Pierce)

Jeck, a 19th Security Forces Squadron military working dog, receives an eye check during an exam Aug. 21, 2013, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The veterinarian clinic’s primary mission is to provide full medical care for the military working dogs to ensure the dogs are fully mission-capable. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caleb Pierce)

LITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE, Ark. -- For animal lovers, the Little Rock Air Force Base Veterinary Treatment Facility provides many services to help keep Team Little Rock's pets healthy.

The veterinary facility specializes mainly in dogs, cats and occasionally horses.

"Our main mission here is the health and care of our military working dogs," said Army Staff Sgt. Travis Lausier, noncommissioned officer in charge of the base Veterinary Treatment Facility. "After that, it's preventive medicine like the prevention of non-diseases which incorporates with our privately-owned mission."

The clinic offers several services also offered off base such as: annual vaccines, rabies, distemper, bordetella, as well as routine surgeries, spays, neuters and dentals.

"The biggest difference is that we're geared toward preventive medicine, vaccinations, health certificates, and off-base vet clinics have a broader capability," said Lausier. "They usually can do overnight care and boarding; things like that, we can't do here. We can do most of the basic things, spays, neuters, basic sick call, but anything that needs specialty or anything above normal will have to go somewhere else."

Along with the preventative care, vaccines and routine surgeries, the clinic can provide medicine as well.

"It's pretty comparable with what you find off base," said Dr. Arnetha Brooks, clinic veterinarian. "We're only allowed to carry certain products, but we do have quite a few products that cover fleas and ticks, heartworm preventative, some of your more common pharmaceuticals like some antibiotics, pain medications and routine medications."

These services and more are provided to any active duty member, retiree, reservists, or anyone with an ID card.

The staff enjoys taking care of all pets as well as the military working dogs.

"I love working here on base to actually help provide services to the military families and of course take care of my military working dogs," said Brooks. "That is an experience that you don't hear people say they would get very often to actually be able to help our military service men and women and of course work with the military working dogs."

With the clinic being located on base, it provides accessible and quick service for ID holders.

"The big factor is convenience for me," said Jennifer Nordquest, clinic customer. "I never have to worry about the cleanliness of the facility on base. I know I can count on a clean facility. I have always had a good experience with vets on different bases. They are like a one-stop shop."

The staff encourages everyone with pets to take advantage of their many services and hopes to increase the number of customers they have.

"I love working here," said Brooks. "I just wish more people knew about it. A lot of people on base don't know that we are here and that we provide services. I would love for all the military and retired military people to be able to take advantage of the services we offer and to know that we are here for them."

The clinic's hours of operation are Monday - Friday from 8 a.m. - 4 p.m., by appointment only. Surgeries or any sedated procedures are scheduled for Thursdays and Fridays. Routine procedures like spays, neuters and growth removals are performed on Thursday, and dental cleanings are performed on Fridays.

For more information, check out their Facebook page, LRAFB veterinary services, or call 501-987-7249.