@charset "utf-8"; /* CSS Document */ p { font-family: "Comic Sans MS", sans-serif; font-size: 20pt;} blockquote { width: 100%; font-size: 18pt; font-style: italic; font-family: 'Comic Sans MS', sans-serif; margin: 10px 10px 10px 10px; padding: 10px; } h1 { h1 class="title"; font-size: 14pt; margin-bottom: 5px; margin-top: 0; line-height: 1.2; font-family: 'Comic Sans MS', Arial, sans-serif; color:#000000; text-transform: uppercase;} .da_body h1 { font-size: 40px; margin-bottom: 5px;margin-top:0; line-height: 1.2; font-family: 'Comic Sans MS', Arial, sans-serif; color: #123D63}

HomeNewsArticle Display

Mobility Airmen exercise ACE, joint force integration in Indo-Pacific

An aircraft sits on the flightline prior to takeoff.

A C-130J Super Hercules assigned to the 19th Airlift Wing prepares for takeoff on the flightline at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, April 1, 2021. The 41st Airlift Squadron recently completed a ten-day off station training event at JBPHH that tested a range of aircrew and maintenance capabilities in an unfamiliar environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

An aircraft sits on the flightline prior to takeoff.

A C-130J Super Hercules assigned to the 19th Airlift Wing sits on the flightline at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, April 1, 2021. The 41st Airlift Squadron recently completed a ten-day off station training event at JBPHH that tested a range of aircrew and maintenance capabilities in an unfamiliar environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

Soldiers board an aircraft.

Soldiers from the 25th Infantry Division prepare to board a C-130J Super Hercules at Bradshaw Army Airfield, Hawaii, April 1, 2020. Airmen from the 41st Airlift Squadron flew multiple airlift missions – transporting troops and cargo – in support of the 25th ID’s field training exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A fighter aircraft flies over Hawaii.

An F-22 Raptor assigned to the 19th Fighter squadron flies over Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, March 31, 2021. Two C-130J Super Hercules flew alongside two F-22 Raptors to allow aircrew from the 41st Airlift Squadron to exercise combat capabilities they would see if the aircraft were to come under attack. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A fighter aircraft flies over Hawaii.

An F-22 Raptor assigned to the 19th Fighter squadron flies over Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, March 31, 2021. Two C-130J Super Hercules flew alongside two F-22 Raptors to allow aircrew from the 41st Airlift Squadron to exercise combat capabilities they would see if the aircraft were to come under attack. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

An aircraft flies over Hawaii

A C-130J Super Hercules assigned to the 19th Airlift Wing flies over Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, April 6, 2021. The 41st Airlift Squadron recently completed a ten-day off station training event at JBPHH that tested a range of aircrew and maintenance capabilities in an unfamiliar environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

An aircraft flies over the ocean in Hawaii

A C-130J Super Hercules flies over Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, April 5, 2021. The 41st Airlift Squadron recently completed a ten-day off station training event at JBPHH that tested a range of aircrew and maintenance capabilities in an unfamiliar environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A bundle is dropped from the back of an aircraft

Loadmasters from the 41st Airlift Squadron drop a low-cost low-altitude bundle from the back of a C-130J Super Hercules over the ocean near Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, April 6, 2021. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A Navy SEAL parachutes into the water

A Navy SEAL parachutes into the water near Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, April 6, 2021. Navy SEALs worked in conjunction with aircrew from the 41st Airlift Squadron and drop-zone coordinators to accomplish required high altitude low opening jumps from two C-130J Super Hercules. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A Navy SEAL and his parachute land in the water
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 10 of 16

A Navy SEAL parachutes into the water near Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, April 6, 2021. Navy SEALs worked in conjunction with aircrew from the 41st Airlift Squadron and drop-zone coordinators to accomplish required high altitude low opening jumps from two C-130J Super Hercules. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A forklift carries a M119 howitzer onto an aircraft
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 11 of 16

Soldiers from the U.S. Army’s 25th Infantry Division watch as 41st Airlift Squadron loadmasters load a M119 howitzer onto a C-130J Super Hercules on the flightline at Joint Base Pearl harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, April 6, 2021. This training acted as an opportunity for Soldiers and aircrew to further enhance capabilities and get hands-on training with equipment, procedures, and personnel that they do not typically see while at home-station or down-range during deployments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A Marine kneels on top of an aircraft refueling tanker
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 12 of 16

A Marine checks an aircraft refueling tanker at Marine Corp Base Hawaii, Hawaii, April 5, 2021. Loadmasters from the 41st Airlift Squadron enhanced the 19th Airlift Wing’s joint force integration by demonstrating how to successfully execute a wet wing defuel on a C-130J to a group of Marines. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

An aircraft sits on the flightline at Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Hawaii.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 13 of 16

Loadmasters from the 41st Airlift Squadron demonstrate how to perform a wet wing defuel on a C-130J Super Hercules at Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Hawaii, April 5, 2021. During a wet-wing defuel, fuel is off-loaded from C-130Js into a fuel truck, which could then refuel fighter aircraft during rapid crew swap-out procedures in austere environments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

An Airman watches as a wet-wing defuel is performed on an aircraft.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 14 of 16

Senior Airman D’Angelo Seabron, 19th Operations Support Squadron loadmaster, watches as a wet-wing defuel is performed on a C-130J Super Hercules at Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Hawaii, April 5, 2021. During a wet-wing defuel, fuel is off-loaded from C-130Js into a fuel truck, which could then refuel fighter aircraft during rapid crew swap-out procedures in austere environments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A wet-wing defuel is performed on an aircraft.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 15 of 16

Loadmasters from the 41st Airlift Squadron perform a wet-wing defuel on a C-130J Super Hercules at Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Hawaii, April 5, 2021. Loadmasters from the 41st AS enhanced the 19th Airlift Wing’s joint force integration by demonstrating how to successfully execute a wet wing defuel on a C-130J to a group of Marines. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

A refueling tanker performs a wet-wing defuel.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 16 of 16

An aircraft refueling tanker prepares to perform a wet-wing defuel on a C-130J Super Hercules at Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Hawaii, April 5, 2021. Loadmasters from the 41st Airlift Squadron enhanced the 19th Airlift Wing’s joint force integration by demonstrating how to successfully execute a wet wing defuel on a C-130J to a group of Marines. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jayden Ford)

LITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE, Ark. -- As part of an effort to maximize Mobility Air Forces and Combat Air Forces integration as well as enhance agile combat employment capabilities in the Indo-Pacific theater, a contingent of Airmen from the 19th Airlift Wing participated in an off-station training exercise at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, March 29 – April 7.

Led by the 41st Airlift Squadron, alongside Airmen from the 19th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron and 19th Operations Support Squadron, Airmen completed 24 sorties, 88 flying hours, and more than 700 training events during the OST.

This training afforded C-130J Super Hercules’ aircrews the opportunity to further enhance their capabilities and receive hands-on experience with equipment, procedures, and personnel that they do not typically see while at home-station or downrange during deployments.

“Our main goal was to challenge and train our aircraft commander upgrade students by exposing them to different threat based scenarios,” said Capt. Lionel Alford, 41st AS instructor pilot and OST deputy mission commander. “By training in an environment that is completely different than the one we are familiar with, we are able to expand the boundaries of our tactics, techniques and procedures.”

The 10-day training exercise began with the integration of F-22 Raptors from the 19th Fighter Squadron, simulating an engagement from fighter aircraft and testing the C-130J’s defensive systems while enhancing ACE concepts in support of the joint and combined warfighter.

While conducting operations out of JBPHH, Airmen also had the chance to work hand-in-hand with the U.S. Army’s 25th Infantry Division, building upon their ability to integrate with joint forces by providing airlift support to the unit — transporting personnel and equipment, including the M777 Howitzer, into a simulated combat zone.

“This OST offered our loadmasters a great opportunity to work with some of the non-standard missions we are tasked with,” said Senior Airman Kirk Mumau, 41st AS instructor loadmaster. “When we’re at home-station and even during deployments, we traditionally haul cargo most of the time, so this gave them the hands-on experience necessary to learn a new skillset.”

Falling under the scope of ACE core competencies, aircrews also provided wet-wing defuel training to U.S. Marines at Marine Corps Base Hawaii, and provided airlift support for U.S. Navy special operations forces who performed high-altitude low-opening jumps.

“All of the training we participated in allowed us to hone our full spectrum readiness and joint interoperability,” Alford said. “The working relationship that we built with the 25th Infantry Division, the Marines out of Marine Corps Base Hawaii, the Navy SEALs, and our other Air Force partners allowed us to exercise our abilities as the 19th Airlift Wing and 41st AS and deliver on our motto of anywhere, anytime.”

Alford added that this OST serves as an example of the 19th AW’s commitment to project and sustain agile combat airlift in any area of responsibility and successfully integrate its personnel and resources to accomplish the mission no matter the tasking.

“It's easy to get used to performing what we do at home station, so it’s important to take that on the road and apply our lessons learned in a different environment,” Alford said. “It is vital to expose our members to working with different units and strive to advance joint integration to ensure that we, as well as any other unit we work with, can better project and sustain combat forces across the world in support of the Department of Defense.”

USAF Comments Policy
If you wish to comment, use the text box below. AF reserves the right to modify this policy at any time.

This is a moderated forum. That means all comments will be reviewed before posting. In addition, we expect that participants will treat each other, as well as our agency and our employees, with respect. We will not post comments that contain abusive or vulgar language, spam, hate speech, personal attacks, violate EEO policy, are offensive to other or similar content. We will not post comments that are spam, are clearly "off topic", promote services or products, infringe copyright protected material, or contain any links that don't contribute to the discussion. Comments that make unsupported accusations will also not be posted. The AF and the AF alone will make a determination as to which comments will be posted. Any references to commercial entities, products, services, or other non-governmental organizations or individuals that remain on the site are provided solely for the information of individuals using this page. These references are not intended to reflect the opinion of the AF, DoD, the United States, or its officers or employees concerning the significance, priority, or importance to be given the referenced entity, product, service, or organization. Such references are not an official or personal endorsement of any product, person, or service, and may not be quoted or reproduced for the purpose of stating or implying AF endorsement or approval of any product, person, or service.

Any comments that report criminal activity including: suicidal behaviour or sexual assault will be reported to appropriate authorities including OSI. This forum is not:

  • This forum is not to be used to report criminal activity. If you have information for law enforcement, please contact OSI or your local police agency.
  • Do not submit unsolicited proposals, or other business ideas or inquiries to this forum. This site is not to be used for contracting or commercial business.
  • This forum may not be used for the submission of any claim, demand, informal or formal complaint, or any other form of legal and/or administrative notice or process, or for the exhaustion of any legal and/or administrative remedy.

AF does not guarantee or warrant that any information posted by individuals on this forum is correct, and disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from reliance on any such information. AF may not be able to verify, does not warrant or guarantee, and assumes no liability for anything posted on this website by any other person. AF does not endorse, support or otherwise promote any private or commercial entity or the information, products or services contained on those websites that may be reached through links on our website.

Members of the media are asked to send questions to the public affairs through their normal channels and to refrain from submitting questions here as comments. Reporter questions will not be posted. We recognize that the Web is a 24/7 medium, and your comments are welcome at any time. However, given the need to manage federal resources, moderating and posting of comments will occur during regular business hours Monday through Friday. Comments submitted after hours or on weekends will be read and posted as early as possible; in most cases, this means the next business day.

For the benefit of robust discussion, we ask that comments remain "on-topic." This means that comments will be posted only as it relates to the topic that is being discussed within the blog post. The views expressed on the site by non-federal commentators do not necessarily reflect the official views of the AF or the Federal Government.

To protect your own privacy and the privacy of others, please do not include personally identifiable information, such as name, Social Security number, DoD ID number, OSI Case number, phone numbers or email addresses in the body of your comment. If you do voluntarily include personally identifiable information in your comment, such as your name, that comment may or may not be posted on the page. If your comment is posted, your name will not be redacted or removed. In no circumstances will comments be posted that contain Social Security numbers, DoD ID numbers, OSI case numbers, addresses, email address or phone numbers. The default for the posting of comments is "anonymous", but if you opt not to, any information, including your login name, may be displayed on our site.

Thank you for taking the time to read this comment policy. We encourage your participation in our discussion and look forward to an active exchange of ideas.