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Green Flag Little Rock fosters international, joint military relationships

A rectangle photo with a male looking out an aircraft windshield at an aircraft.

Pilots from the Royal Canadian Air Force 436th Transport Squadron taxi a C-130J during Green Flag Little Rock 18-04, Feb. 15, 2018 at Little Rock Air Force base, Ark. No two exercises are the same, which helps the mobility enterprise continually challenge their warfighting skills, while providing unique real-world experiences with international partners. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Grace Nichols)

A square photo with two males in U.S. Air Force and Royal Canadian Air Force uniforms speaking to a male in a U.S. Army uniform.

Maj. Gen. Gary Brito, Fort Polk Joint Readiness Training Center commanding general, speaks to members of the U.S. Air Force and the Royal Canadian Air Force during Green Flag Little Rock 18-04, Feb. 15, 2018 at Fort Polk, La. Each exercise was tailored to the individual unit's requirements while providing certain major command specific designated training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Grace Nichols)

A square photo with a male wearing a headset looking out an aircraft windshield.

Capt. Alex Marcil, Royal Canadian Air Force 436th Transport Squadron pilot, assists operates a C-130J during Green Flag Little Rock 18-04, Feb. 15, 2018 at Fort Polk, La. Green Flag Little Rock provides essential tactical-level training, While working with international partners. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Grace Nichols)

A rectangle photo with two silhouettes in front of an aircraft windshield.

Pilots from the Royal Canadian Air Force 436th Transport Squadron land a C-130J during Green Flag Little Rock 18-04, Feb. 15, 2018 at Little Rock Air Force base, Ark. The units flew to Louisiana to airdrops and perform drills and training, focusing on collaborating forces and integrating with several different career fields and services. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Grace Nichols)

A rectangle photo with males in uniform in front of a flightline with aircraft.

A member of the Royal Canadian Air Force 436th Transport Squadron explains hand signals for a potential free fall jump to members of the U.S. Army during Green Flag Little Rock 18-04, Feb. 15, 2018 at Fort Polk, La. All participants in the exercise received realistic and tactical-level training to better support both local and global mobility operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Grace Nichols)

LITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE, Ark. --

A square photo with the shoulder of U.S. Army member on the left with U.S. flag on his sleeve, and a member of the Royal Canadian Air Force on the right with a Canadian symbol on his sleeve.
Members of the U.S. Army and the Royal Canadian Air Force work together during Green Flag Little Rock 18-04, Feb. 15, 2018 at Fort Polk, La. The intent of the exercise was to foster communications before potential deployments, streamlining training and sharing knowledge to bolster readiness during an actual contingency. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Grace Nichols)
A square photo with the shoulder of U.S. Army member on the left with U.S. flag on his sleeve, and a member of the Royal Canadian Air Force on the right with a Canadian symbol on his sleeve.
Green Flag Little Rock fosters international, joint military relationships
Members of the U.S. Army and the Royal Canadian Air Force work together during Green Flag Little Rock 18-04, Feb. 15, 2018 at Fort Polk, La. The intent of the exercise was to foster communications before potential deployments, streamlining training and sharing knowledge to bolster readiness during an actual contingency. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Grace Nichols)
The 34th Combat Training Squadron, the U.S. Army and the Royal Canadian Air Force worked together during Green Flag Little Rock 18-04 Feb. 8-17, 2018, emphasizing strengthening international and joint service relationships.

Two Canadian C-130J’s flew from Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, in support of U.S. Army operations at the Joint Readiness Training Center in Fort Polk, Louisiana.

The units performed free-fall jumps from aircraft and practiced drills and training, focusing on collaborating forces and integrating with several different career fields. While GFLR provides essential tactical-level training, the experience of working with international partners is also vital in a deployed environment.

“We have just over 800 soldiers on jump status, so our ability to jump preferably once a month is key to maintaining our skills,” said Maj. Gen. Gary Brito, Fort Polk Joint Readiness Training Center commanding general. “Luckily we get support from the Air Force all the time, and having the ability to work with our Canadian counterparts is a joy and a privilege that we want to take advantage of.”

All participants in the exercise received realistic and tactical-level training to better support both local and global mobility operations. Each exercise was tailored to the individual unit's requirements while providing certain major command specific designated training.

“We refer to this training as our proving ground,” said Capt. Jeff Lafontaine, Royal Canadian Air Force 436th Transport Squadron aircraft commander. “Training like this prepares us for deployment overseas. The relationships and joint training between the Canadians and the Americans is important because we work with each other while deployed.”

The exercise goal is fostering communications before potential deployments, streamlining training and sharing knowledge to bolster readiness during an actual contingency.

“This is a truly combined operation,” said Staff Sgt. Jonathan Peavy, 34th CTS survival, evasion, resistance and escape specialist. “We have Air Force, Army, and Canadian Forces. It’s a pretty awesome experience.”

No two exercises are the same, which helps the mobility enterprise continually challenge their readiness and warfighting skills, while providing unique real-world experiences with joint and international partners.

“It’s a great opportunity to do a joint operation and coalition with our Canadian partners,” Brito said. “It’s key to the Department of Defense to ensure the Army is able to operate with our joint partners in the U.S. services and our coalition partners that we train and fight with.”