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Materiel management: Circulating supplies, excellence

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Emily Reed, 19th Logistics Readiness Squadron flight service center journeyman, tags a coupling clamp to maintain accountability of the product June 8, 2016, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The 19th LRS has maintained a 98-percent inventory accuracy rate over the past year, surpassing the Air Mobility Command’s 97-percent standard. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Kevin Sommer Giron)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Emily Reed, 19th Logistics Readiness Squadron flight service center journeyman, tags a coupling clamp to maintain accountability of the product June 8, 2016, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The 19th LRS has maintained a 98-percent inventory accuracy rate over the past year, surpassing the Air Mobility Command’s 97-percent standard. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Kevin Sommer Giron)

Three airmen in a warehouse search through boxes.

Airmen from the 19th Logistics Readiness Squadron central storage element inventories a mobile readiness package July 25, 2017, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. Central storage is a part of the materiel management flight, which stocks and issues 522,000 assets worth more than $35 million. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mercedes Taylor)

Male senior airman checks a returned item status that was on a industrial line.

Senior Airman Frank Mitchell, 19th Logistics Readiness Squadron flight service center journeyman, inspects an aircraft part July 25, 2017, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The flight service center, part of the materiel management flight, is responsible for the turn-of all equipment, including maintenance items. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mercedes Taylor)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. John Torres, 19th Civil Engineer Squadron power production non-commissioned officer in charge, returns his individual protective equipment June 8, 2016, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The IPE office equips Airmen with life-saving chemical gear and individual body armor for contingency deployments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Kevin Sommer Giron)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. John Torres, 19th Civil Engineer Squadron power production non-commissioned officer in charge, returns his individual protective equipment June 8, 2016, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The IPE office equips Airmen with life-saving chemical gear and individual body armor for contingency deployments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Kevin Sommer Giron)

Female staff sergeant poses in front boxes with her arms crossed.

Staff Sgt. Nisreen Kingma, 19th Logistics Readiness Squadron central storage journeyman, is assigned to the 19th LRS materiel management flight at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. Materiel management, often referred to as supply, is tasked with managing and distributing out Air Force assets to various units. The flight is made of five elements: central storage, customer support, equipment accountability, inventory and inspection, and the flight service center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mercedes Taylor)

LITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE, Ark. --

Hundreds of Airmen from multiple sections work together to keep the mission moving. Similar to their counterparts, the 19th Logistics Readiness Squadron materiel management flight works hard 24/7 to pump out essential components to keep the Combat Airlift mission going.

The 19th LRS materiel management flight, often referred to as supply, manages and distributes Air Force assets to various units - such as aircraft parts to maintenance - and deployment gear for tasked individuals.

“We’re one of the top five materiel management shops in Air Mobility Command,” said Master Sgt. Clarissa Piedra, 19th LRS asset management section chief. “We have seven dedicated sections that are responsible for demand processing and mission support, ensuring that we have appropriate stock levels and equipment available to meet the base’s needs.”

The materiel management flight is staffed by more than 75 personnel who make up their multiple components: central storage, customer support, equipment accountability, inventory and inspection, and the flight service center.

Central Storage

  • Stocks, stores and issues 522,000 assets worth approximately $55 million.

  • Maintain 18 readiness kits known as Mobility Readiness Spares Packages.

Customer Support

  • Monitors 50,000 supply transactions monthly and manages 201 organization accounts across the 19th and the 314th Airlift Wings.

  • The equipment accountability element, a part of customer support, oversees 95 equipment accounts, valued at approximately $450 million, and manages equipment assets deployed worldwide.

Inventory and Inspection

  • Performs annual hands-on counting of more than 522,000 assets worth more than $55 million.

Individual Protective Equipment

  • Manages individual protective equipment and other items for deployment to 41 base-level units including approximately 3,000 weapons in their own armory.

  • Provides storage for 65,000 assets worth approximately $9 million.

Flight Service Center

  • Coordinates the turn-of all equipment, consumable and due-in from maintenance items and supports turn-in, movement and accountability of reparable assets.

  • Processes 2,500 unserviceable and serviceable items quarterly valued at approximately $46 million.

     

Despite their many sections and various objectives, the components of materiel management work cohesively together to get the job done.

“It’s incredibly crucial that we work together, especially with mission capability assets,” said Tech. Sgt. Melinda Forston, 19th LRS equipment accountability NCO in charge. “Everybody has a role and we all have to work together and communicate to make that happen.”

Whether they’re storing a propeller, distributing gas masks, or managing an equipment account, the Airmen in the materiel management flight keeps the Combat Airlift mission alive and well. As they continue to circulate supplies to units around Little Rock Air Force Base, they remind Airmen that ‘you can’t fly without supply.’