Photos

Keyword: Category: Tag: Sort By:
1 2 3 4 5 Next
U.S. Air Force Airman Ian Steele, 19th Operations Support Squadron Airfield Management shift lead, mans the customer service desk March 20, 2017, at the airfield management shop on Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. Members of the 19th Operations Support Squadron Airfield Management team work around the clock to provide a safe, efficient and effective airfield environment for all aircraft operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Grace Nichols)
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joseph Way, 19th Operations Support Squadron Airfield Management shift lead, looks for safety hazards March 20, 2017, on the flightline at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The airfield management team conducts airfield checks every two hours, looking for problems from potholes to foreign objects and debris. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Grace Nichols)
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joseph Way, 19th Operations Support Squadron Airfield Management shift lead, listens for radio instructions March 20, 2017, at the flightline on Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. Eleven service members and two civilians make up the airfield management crew, responsible for ensuring a safe and ready airfield. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Grace Nichols)
Download Full Image Photo Details
A 19th Operations Support Squadron Airfield Management Airman answers a customer request March 20, 2017, at the airfield management shop on Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. Airfield management team constantly coordinates with the air traffic control tower, security forces, protocol various other base units. Each shop serves a different purpose, from reviewing flight plans to keeping birds away. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Grace Nichols)
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Mellisa Tolliver, 19th Operations Support Squadron NCO in charge of aircrew flight equipment, was nominated as Combat Airlifter of the Week March 20, 2017, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. Tolliver showcases Integrity First by being honest and owning her mistakes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Sommer Giron)
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Katie Cogbill, 19th Medical Operations Squadron medical technician, takes a selfie with her son, Barrett. (Courtesy photo)
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Katie Cogbill, 19th Medical Operations Squadron medical technician, poses for a photo with her husband, Daniel, and her son, Barrett, during the 2016 19th Airlift Wing Annual Awards ceremony Jan. 27, 2017, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. Cogbill went up against four other Airmen from the 19th AW to win the award. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Sommer Giron)
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Nicholas Armitage, 19th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, checks the top of the C-130J aircraft during pre-flight inspections March 15, 2017 at Little Rock Air Force Base. This C-130J was the first one delivered to AMC here at Little Rock a decade ago and is still providing combat airlift for Little Rock, AMC and the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jeremy McGuffin)
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman HTyler Kelley, 19th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician, wears an EOD 9 Bomb Suit March 15, 2017, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. Bomb suits can range in weight from 70-80 pounds. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Stephanie Serrano)
Download Full Image Photo Details
An Air Force Medium Size Robot, controlled by a 19th Civil Engineer Squadron Airmen, picks up a training inert mortar March 15, 2017, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. Each robot costs approximately $25 million. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Stephanie Serrano)
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Colton Lien, 19th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technician, inspects an F6A Robot and performs routine maintenance March 15, 2017, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. Each robot costs approximately $25 million and must undergo a bi-annual inspection. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Stephanie Serrano)
Download Full Image Photo Details
During the week of March 4-8, in 1970 - the C-130 Hercules era dawned at Little Rock AFB, as the first installment of C-130Es slotted to depart Sewart AFB in Tennessee arrived at “The Rock.”

These planes belonged to the 64th Tactical Airlift Wing, whose personnel had begun transferring here in February following deactivation of the base’s last bombardment wing.

Along with the departure of the last B-58 Hustler in mid-January, these events represented the symbolic conversion of Little Rock AFB’s primary mission from strategic deterrence to combat airlift. The base’s official transfer from Strategic Air Command to Tactical Air Command occurred at the end of March. 

Strategic Air Command did retain a presence on base with the 308th Strategic Missile Wing operating here until 1988.
Also, as an added bit of trivia, the 308th SMW served as the temporary host of Little Rock AFB during the two-month interim before the 64th assumed host responsibilities.

The image here shows Jacksonville’s mayor at the time christening tail number 6-5-8-3, the “City of Jacksonville.” 
This was the first Hercules to arrive, having done so on March 4th.
Download Full Image Photo Details
On March 6, 1942, the new and not-so-improved tail number 3-0-9-7, aka “The Swoose,” flew its first recorded flight. This is arguably the most recognized aircraft in our collective 19th history.  It’s also the oldest surviving B-17, pre-dating the U.S.’s entry into the Second World War.

Originally known as “Ole Betsy,” this B-17 was assigned to the 14th Bombardment Squadron, one of the 19th’s (BG) two squadrons that had escaped the Japanese surprise attack on Clark Field on December 7, 1941.  3-0-9-7 participated in several bombing missions following that raid. But it was damaged following an air battle in January and had suffered overall deterioration due to extensive time in the air with little recovery after flying missions.

Repairs began in late-January 1942 while the remnants of the 19th Bombardment Group were in Australia. At the time, maintenance crews rarely possessed any new spare parts. Therefore, all materials used to repair the aircraft were obtained from other battle-damaged and war-weary B-17s. It received a new tail structure, rudder, and elevators from one aircraft, and wings, wheels, and brakes from three others. Maintenance personnel also converted the aircraft into an armed transport.

Because of its new configuration, the hybrid airplane was playfully rechristened “The Swoose,” the idea coming from a popular – yet insensitive – 1941 song “Alexander the Swoose.” The tune was about a goose who looked different, sung from the perspective of Alexander’s tormenters:“Here comes little Alexander,
        What a funny looking gander.
        He’s half swan and he’s half goose,
        ha ha ha, he’s just a swoose.”

The aircraft avoided the scrap heap because it was assigned as a command plane, and was the only B-17 that served from the beginning of the war to the end.
Download Full Image Photo Details
Ten years ago on March 13, 2007, Air Mobility Command’s first C-130J arrived at Little Rock AFB.  It was assigned to the 463d Airlift Group (middle shield).

The following month, the 463d AG gained the 41st Airlift Squadron after its transfer from Pope AFB. The 41st AS would be the first active-duty combat C-130J squadron in the Air Force, and this J-model would be the first of sixteen ultimately assigned to the squadron.

However, this was NOT the first J-model on base. That distinction belongs to the 48th Airlift Squadron of the 314th Airlift Wing, which received its first C-130J three years prior.

IMAGES: The image you see here is of Tail Number 4631 arriving at “The Rock,” flown by AMC’s commander at the time, General Duncan McNabb.
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jacob Phipps, 19th Operations Support Squadron Weather Flight journeyman, uses a laser range finder during a tornado watch Feb. 28, 2017, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. As meteorologists, Airmen monitor weather patterns 24/7 to alert aircrews and base populace of severe weather conditions imminent in the local area. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Sommer Giron)
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jacob Phipps, 19th Operations Support Squadron Weather Flight journeyman, monitors a radar screen Feb. 29, 2017, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The radars enable Phipps to identify precipitation, lightning strikes and potential thunderstorms within the local area. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Sommer Giron)
Download Full Image Photo Details
1 2 3 4 5 Next