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SERE ensures full-spectrum readiness through joint training

People in uniform perform and prepare for freefall jumps.

Specialists from the 19th Operation Support Squadron survival, evasion, resistance and escape flight, prepare for a freefall from a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter June 28, 2018, at Camp Robinson, Ark. SERE specialists accomplish up to 12 jumps each year in order to maintain their qualifications. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Grace Nichols)

People in uniform perform and prepare for freefall jumps.

A UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter from the Arkansas National Guard is used for a freefall personnel jump June 28, 2018, at Camp Robinson, Ark. The jump was part of the regular training survival, evasion, resistance and escape specialists must receive. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Grace Nichols)

People in uniform perform and prepare for freefall jumps.

Specialists from the 19th Operation Support Squadron survival, evasion, resistance and escape flight, freefall from a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter June 28, 2018, at Camp Robinson, Ark. SERE specialists accomplish up to 12 jumps each year in order to maintain their qualifications. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Grace Nichols)

People in uniform perform and prepare for freefall jumps.

Specialists from the 19th Operation Support Squadron survival, evasion, resistance and escape flight, land after a freefall jump from a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter June 28, 2018, at Camp Robinson, Ark. The jump was part of the regular training SERE specialists must receive. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Grace Nichols)

People in uniform perform and prepare for freefall jumps.

Master Sgt. Edmund Dawejko, 19th Operations Support Squadron survival, evasion, resistance and escape superintendent, prepares for a military freefall jump June 28, 2018, at Camp Robinson, Ark. SERE specialists trained with the Arkansas Army National Guard to test readiness capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Grace Nichols)

People in uniform perform and prepare for freefall jumps.

Maj. Joshua Stoley, 19th Airlift Wing deputy wing chaplain, middle right, receives flight familiarization from 19th Operation Support Squadron survival, evasion, resistance and escape specialists June 28, 2018, at Camp Robinson, Ark. Part of the Chaplain Corps mission allows chaplains and chaplain assistants to learn the workflow of different career field’s by observing similar procedures. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Grace Nichols)

People in uniform perform and prepare for freefall jumps.

Master Sgt. Edmund Dawejko, 19th Operations Support Squadron survival, evasion, resistance and escape flight superintendent, prepares for a military freefall jump June 28, 2018, at Camp Robinson, Ark. SERE specialists must maintain mission readiness by practicing military free-fall jumps while being subjected to multiple scenarios as part of their training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Grace Nichols)

People in uniform perform and prepare for freefall jumps.

Lt. Col. Timothy Stout, 19th Aeromedical Squadron high-altitude airdrop mission center director, prepares for a military freefall jump June 28, 2018, at Camp Robinson, Ark. This was the final jump before the HAAMS center moves to Charleston, South Carolina. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Grace Nichols)

People in uniform perform and prepare for freefall jumps.

Specialists from the 19th Operations Support Squadron survival, evasion, resistance and escape freefall from a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter June 28, 2018, at Camp Robinson, Ark. The jump was part of the regular training SERE specialists must receive. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Grace Nichols)

LITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE, Ark. --

Specialists from the 19th Operations Support Squadron survival, evasion, resistance and escape flight, performed freefall jumps from a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter June 28, 2018, at Camp Robinson, Arkansas.

The Arkansas Army National Guard aircrew and the SERE specialists train together to keep skills sharp while maintaining the required training for both branches to encompass full-spectrum readiness.

“There’s inherent risk with [freefall] jumps,” said Master Sgt. Edmund Dawejko, 19th OSS SERE superintendent. “The more we train for it, the lower the risks, so when we have to do something real-world, it isn’t the first time we’ve done it.”