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GFLR 18-06: Delivering military reach with agile combat airlift

Staff Sgt. Michael Demik, 39th Airlift Squadron evaluator loadmaster, surveys an area during Green Flag Little Rock April 10, 2018, near Alexandria, La. Green Flag allows the Air Force to work with sister services and partners in the Mobility Air Forces to prepare mobility Airmen for real-world threats. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Codie Collins)

Staff Sgt. Michael Demik, 39th Airlift Squadron evaluator loadmaster, surveys an area during Green Flag Little Rock April 10, 2018, near Alexandria, La. Green Flag allows the Air Force to work with sister services and partners in the Mobility Air Forces to prepare mobility Airmen for real-world threats. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Codie Collins)

Men stand in the back of a C-130J and look out of the window.

U.S. Army soldiers prepare to parachute into an exercise region as part of Green Flag Little Rock 18-06 April 12, 2018, near Alexandria, La. No two Green Flag Little Rock exercises are the same, which helps the mobility enterprise, international partners and sister services continually challenge their warfighting skills, while providing real-world experiences. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jeremy McGuffin)

Woman looks at C-130 from back of C-130J.

Australian Air Force Flight Lt. Eleanor Bradshaw, 37 squadron C-130J pilot, exits the back of a C-130J during exercise Green Flag Little Rock Apr. 12, 2018, at Ft. Polk, La. Green Flag Little Rock works to improve mission management, situational awareness, interoperability and weather planning. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Rhett Isbell)

A photo depicting people in uniform in or around an aircraft

Senior Airman Ryan Firl, Dyess Air Force Base 39th Airlift Squadron loadmaster and Chief Master Sgt. William Wunderlin, Moffet Air National Guard 130th Rescue Squadron observer coach trainer and loadmaster, gather parachute bags after a cargo drop during Green Flag Little Rock 18-06 April 10, 2018, at Alexandria, La. No two Green Flag Little Rock exercises are the same, which helps the mobility enterprise continually challenge their warfighting skills, while providing real-world experiences. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Grace Nichols)

Green Flag is an Air Mobility Command live joint training tactical exercise which maximizes proficiencies in command and control, planning, airlift and air mobility support operations. Mobility Air Force units trained with Army brigade-level units in a simulated combat environment to hone skills needed in deployed locations. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Codie Collins)

Green Flag is an Air Mobility Command live joint training tactical exercise which maximizes proficiencies in command and control, planning, airlift and air mobility support operations. Mobility Air Force units trained with Army brigade-level units in a simulated combat environment to hone skills needed in deployed locations. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Codie Collins)

An M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket System is loaded onto a C130-J during Green Flag Little Rock April 10, 2018, near Alexandria, La. The HIMARS carries six rockets and can launch the entire multiple launch rocket system family of munitions. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Codie Collins)

An M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket System is loaded onto a C130-J during Green Flag Little Rock April 10, 2018, near Alexandria, La. The HIMARS carries six rockets and can launch the entire multiple launch rocket system family of munitions. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Codie Collins)

LITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE, Ark. --

Personnel from the 34th Combat Training Squadron and U.S. Army personnel collaborated with coalition forces from France, New Zealand and Australia during the Green Flag Little Rock 18-06 exercise April 6-15, 2018, located at both Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, and Ft. Polk, Louisiana.

Green Flag is a live joint-training-tactical exercise which maximizes proficiencies in command and control, planning, airlift and air mobility support operations.

"Our coalition and joint partners are critical to projecting and sustaining combat airlift across the globe," said U.S. Air Force Col. Gerald Donohue, 19th Airlift Wing commander. "Exercises such as Green Flag provide us with opportunities to train together, improve our interoperability and strengthen our partnerships, all of which enable us to provide agile combat airlift at a moment's notice, anywhere in the world."

Goals of Green Flag are to improve mission management, situational awareness and weather planning. Through focused determination, thorough communication and total force integration, these goals were met.

“Green Flag allows the Airmen to have an opportunity to do their job in a static environment before entering a real-world situation,” said Master Sgt. Corey Long, 19th Operations Support Squadron chief of training.”

Additionally, Green Flag allows an array of military forces to hone their skills in a variety strategies which will benefit future operations with Air Force allies.

“The training permitted the U.S. Air Force and international partners to work together and learn from one another,” Long said. “It’s important to train with our partners so we’re better prepared to work in a real-world situation.”

No two exercises are the same, which helps the mobility enterprise continually challenge their warfighting skills, while providing real-world experiences with partners they may not be able to get with home-station training.

The Green Flag Little Rock exercise is the premiere Mobility Air Force training which occurs four times annually. It continuously evolves to prepare the war fighter to perform in any environment.

For more coverage on Green Flag please visit http://www.littlerock.af.mil/.